Undergraduate Semester Course Offerings

You can find the complete Judaic Studies Program course slate on the Registrar's Schedule of Classes. Check back for more course descriptions throughout the registration period.

 


Spring 2021 Courses

Cross-listed with CLAS 2105.82 and JSTD 2001.80

C. Rollston

MW 2:20-3:35

This course explores the literature, history, and religious thought represented by the Hebrew Scriptures (Old Testament). Continuities and contrasts between Israel and the ancient Near East are considered through study of the world view, oral and literary tradition, main religious ideas, and chief figures and movements of the biblical literature.

Cross-listed with HIST 3111.80, JSTD 2001.81

E. Cline

TR 2:20-3:35

This course covers topics in Ancient Art and Archaeology, Ancient History, and Judaic Studies.

Cross-listed with JSTD 2002.80

J. Richter

MW 4:45-6

This course covers the Nuremberg trial and its legacy in subsequent international and hybrid tribunals, and the need for judicial accountability for genocide, crimes against humanity, and war crimes.

Cross-listed with JSTD 2002.82

A. Dubnov

MW 12:45-2

Cross-listed with HONR 2047.81, JSTD 2002.83

W. Reich

W 3:30-6 

As this course fulfills an Honors Self and Society Seminar requirement, it entails understanding significant social and political phenomena by using the tools and modes of inquiry of the social and behavioral sciences; relationships among individuals, collectivities, families and communities; interactions of psychological, social, political, economic and historical forces at work in a given culture.

Cross-listed with JSTD 2002.84

A. Dubnov

MW 3:45-5

Cross-listed with JSTD 2002.85

J. Weissman Joselit

W 12:45-2:35

Crisis! Scandal! Controversy! This seminar explores of series of critical turning points in American Jewish history that prompted American Jewry to take stock of and worry about its place in the United States. Some of these moments had to do with anti-Jewish prejudice, others with economics and still others with matters of faith. Taken together, they challenged the Jewish community to define itself and its relationship with America.

Cross-listed with JSTD 6001.80

I. Weltman

U 9:10-3:30

This course is intended for both undergraduate and graduate students. Contact [email protected] for specific course information. This is a distance learning course.

 

 

Fall 2020 Courses

Cross-listed with JSTD 2002.80

J. Richter

MW 4:45-6 

The origins, causes and significance of the Nazi attempt to destroy European Jewry, within the context of European and Jewish history. Related themes include the behavior of perpetrators, victims and bystanders; literary responses; contemporary implications of the Holocaust for religion and politics.

Cross-listed with HIST 3001.80, JSTD 2002.81, JSTD 6001.80

J. Weissman Joselit

T 5:10-7 

Well before COVID-19 upended life as we know it, the modern Jewish experience in both the United States and Israel challenged traditional notions of belonging, ritual behavior and even romance, as did the startling resurgence of antisemitism. This interdisciplinary seminar explores these and other phenomena on their own terms as well as in light of COVID-19's radical impact -- all with an eye toward figuring out what aspects of Jewish life might stay the same and what might change in its wake.

Cross-listed with HEBR 3104W.80, JSTD 2002.82

O. Zakai

TR 3:45-5:00

This course is a special topic in Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies and a topic in Judaic Studies with a focus on the post-1650 period.

Cross-listed with HONR 2047.81, JSTD 2002.83

W. Reich

W 3:30-6 

As this course fulfills an Honors Self and Society Seminar requirement, it entails understanding significant social and political phenomena by using the tools and modes of inquiry of the social and behavioral sciences; relationships among individuals, collectivities, families and communities; interactions of psychological, social, political, economic and historical forces at work in a given culture.